Political Dynamics after Civil War

We have seen those defending Russia, attacking at the same time welfare measures and rights in the workplaces. We have seen the EU keeping countries like Ukraine and Georgia in the waiting room of integration, as the maidservants of their neoliberal plans. We have seen men and women believing that the European prospect was one of openness and of a better life. But what all these actors have done is nothing but promoting neoliberal exploitative, racist, and patriarchal policies, whilst trying to reinforce armies. Professor Thomas Knieper is Chair of Computer-mediated Communication at the University of Passau, Germany, having previously worked as Full Professor of Mass Communication and Media Studies at the TU Braunschweig, Germany. His main research areas are computer-mediated communication, visual communication, political communication, empirical social research, and journalism.

The Changing Character of War Centre is an Interdisciplinary research centre for the study of change in armed conflict. We are part of the University of Oxford, based at Pembroke College and the Department of Politics and International Relations. In the context of statebuilding and peacebuilding, Catherine Barnes of Conciliation Resources examines changes in ‘the political settlement’ in war-to-peace transitions. The course will provide both an introduction to political theory and to key approaches to international relations.

Learn why the Allies won World War Two, why the US lost in Vietnam and how nuclear weapons affect international security. Explore the themes and issues which drive 21st-century world politics, on a course which takes in conflict, poverty, inequality and trade. Despite knowing this, we are not seeing the necessary progress in areas such as increasing the number of women in elected office, the funding of women candidates, the resourcing of women’s rights organisations or women at the decision-making table. This is what we need to realise a world where equality, health and peace is prioritised.

  • Most modules are 20 credits, meaning you’ll study six modules each year.
  • These include an analysis of why wars begin, how wars are waged, what happens after war has ceased, and the various alternatives to war.
  • This module aims to provide students with an in-depth understanding of the challenges facing post-war societies focusing on transformation, security and governance.
  • We back whoever opposes the war from all sides, and we say that all military and economic reciprocal retaliations must stop immediately.
  • News of the assassination of Franz Ferdinand was met with shock and surprise in Britain, but it was regarded as a distant crisis.

Easy access and established contacts to local and London-based archives, such as the Mass Observation archive in Falmer, and the Imperial War Museum in Lambeth. A vibrant postgraduate student community, active in organising workshops and reading groups. For advice on everything from applying for scholarships to finding additional financial support email If you are an international student you will need to show that your qualifications match our entry requirements.

Introduction to the Politics of the World Economy

Undergraduate War Studies Learn why war has been described as “the continuation of politics by other means” and is said by some to be the single most important social activity that humanity has ever undertaken. UK students can take out a tuition fee loan to cover the cost of their course and a maintenance loan of up to £9,706 to cover living costs. This could include presentations, school experience, work experience or laboratory work. If you’re enrolled on a full-time programme of study, you’ll be expected to complete about 40 hours of academic work each week. Explore the strategic, political and ethical implications of autonomous weapons systems, warfare in cyberspace, and the significance of modern nuclear forces.

It is the result of decisions made by those who hold power – governments and corporations – and a broken economic system which generates increasing wealth and power for elites at the expense of the majority of people on this earth. The aspiration of our research is to produce work of the highest quality and greatest rigour, addressing the most significant themes and challenges produced by war, and analysing the dynamics of change. The Centre is focussed and coheres around the idea of war, that is armed conflict, while engaging with other disciplines and fields to improve the quality and depth of understanding.

Books

But while domestic tensions were rising in Britain, new tensions were coming to the fore in Europe. After defeating France in the Franco-Prussian war of 1870, the most powerful German state Prussia allied with smaller Germanic states to create a united Germany, but this new nation wanted an empire of its own. The Royal Navy policed the waves so that its merchant ships could trade across the globe. This brought the British Empire vast wealth, but not all of its citizens were able to share in it.

Political Party Programmes:

States where women hold more political power are less likely to go to war and less likely to commit human rights abuses. We also know that feminist movements and women’s rights organisations directly address immediate service delivery needs within their own countries that translate into long-term benefits for all. On this module you will explore how policy making takes place in exceptional times. Each week we will sextonseattle.com examine a case study of a political crisis, considering how it unfolded and evaluating the responses. You will use the case studies to discuss the ideas of blame, agenda setting and crisis resolution in these contexts. Drawing on experience you gained in previous modules of designing policy briefs and political party manifestos, you will build transferable skills in prioritisation and working under pressure.

Russian invasion is bringing destruction in Ukraine, but there is no more “democratic” way to carry on war. What we see is a general attempt to redraw global relations in a time when transnational dynamics and movements of people are shaking the very roots of a rotten geopolitical system. At 2pm on 4 August, it issued an ultimatum demanding Germany withdraw its troops. Britain’s entry into war was partially a reaction to larger anxieties about the balance of power in Europe, as well as its own security and position in the world. But by violating Belgium’s neutrality, Germany positioned itself as the belligerent aggressor and made British intervention a moral issue about the rights of small nations.